Fairy Tale Ending – Fear of the Forest (reviewed by Dave Franklin)

a1420886106_16Discovering new music can be like dating, sometimes the chemistry just isn’t right, other times you agree to be friends but know that you won’t see each other again apart from a probable awkward encounter at a diner party a few years down the line and just occasionally it works out beyond expectation. And in this analogy I have just turned into an annoying, lovelorn idiot, fawning over Fear of the Forest’s every move, dreaming of marriage and one day having a brood of medieval instruments of our own. If you haven’t followed that, suffice it to say that I totally love the music that Fear of the Forest make.

As an ex-goth turned folkie with a house full of history books and a penchant for visiting the Middle East when ever money and political climate allow, it is almost as if Fear of The Forest are the result of a series of options I have selected on some futuristic, customise music producing machine.

The album is a clash of occident and orient, of exotic arabesque and pastoral folk threads, of medieval and modern, the classic and the classical, of dark intensities and frivolous jauntiness. It is baroque’n’roll, it is renaissance-core, it is world trotting classical punk…oh, the fun we can have with making up new music labels.

In the hands of lesser musicians and arrangers this might be a bit too much to work with, an audio overload for the listener but the fact that at any time you can clearly identify four or more different musical strands, from any number of genres and cultures running through the song, is a testament to just how deft these people are at weaving exotic musical patterns.

Occidental tourists indeed!

Advertisements

About Dave Franklin

Musician, scribbler, historian, gnostic, seeker of enlightenment, asker of the wrong questions, delver into the lost archives, fugitive from the law of averages, blogger, quantum spanner, left footed traveller, music journalist, zenarchist, freelance writer, reviewer and gemini. People have woken up to worse.
This entry was posted in arabesque, baroque, medieval, post-folk, Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s