Green Jade – Lisabel (reviewed by T. Bebedor)

Songs that start with the bassy, warm tones of a Wurlitzer Organ normally go down well in my opinion, it has the character to gently announce that the music is about to start so find a quiet spot, get comfortable and we’ll begin.

I’m a bit of a sucker for a smooth, silky mood; music to snuggle up to and drift away in, so the lengthy opener is rightly placed, harmonised vocals, the arrival of bass and we’re in.

London-based soul singer Lisabel has the type of voice that seems effortless, bassy, clear, sensual and expressive, no mean feat in a world of warblers and singers trying to cram more and more notes into a melody line. What we have here is control and command and the result is a well-produced, well written piece of music.

We start quietly with a cymbal ticking, a stark drum rim and that voice, before the song finds it’s groove with well-placed harmonising vocals before we return to a cooling off period and then we’re treated to a final flurry of minimal production and I think this is where the song really finds it’s feet. It’s a song for a lazy Sunday afternoon, a song for the bus ride home in the early hours of the morning after a long night out, a song without blurry, over-complicated music.

Bad singers tend to hide away behind production tricks, behind noise and layered instruments, the good voices sit front and centre without need for support, which is what happens here, the music sits exactly where it should; supporting the song and the story but allowing Lisabel to sing and be heard.

 

 

 

 

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