Category Archives: alt-folk

Scene and Heard – CCXVII: Better Off – Leah Capelle

The last time Leah Capelle crossed my path she was giving the music world a lesson in just how to match rock muscle with pop infectiousness to build the perfect pop-rock sound via the song Joshua. This time we find … Continue reading

Posted in alt-folk, alt-pop, folk, indie-pop, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Scene and Heard – CCXVI : The Drink That Kills Me – Willodean

Music and alcohol have always been in a relationship; from the inspiring to the fatal they are both connected in an on going dance. Music has long celebrated and cursed the liquid in equal measure and here Willodean take a … Continue reading

Posted in alt-folk, indie-folk, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Bye Bye – Sophia Marshall (reviewed by Ian O’Regan)

It’s always good to be given the opportunity to get rid of labels that are attached to artists. However well-intentioned they are at first, designed to provide some point of reference when an artist has little or no previous public … Continue reading

Posted in alt-folk, alt-pop, americana, folk, pop, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Scene and Heard – CCXIV: Love Is Just – Scott Kirby

One of the challenges facing the singer-songwriter, voice and guitar driven song is how to sound big. Not big in the bombastic, U2 stadium rock sense but in knowing how to take these simple elements and lift them off the … Continue reading

Posted in acoustica, alt-country, alt-folk, alt-pop, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Nobody Gives a Damn – Owen Sartori (reviewed by Dave Franklin)

All music is a juggling act of views and references, new ideas and absorbed sounds; the art is just not showing the welds that join them all together. Owen Sartori is a top sonic welder. He blurs so many musical … Continue reading

Posted in alt-folk, alt-pop, indie-folk, pop, pop-rock, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Nothing – The Last Dinosaur (reviewed by Thomas Haynes)

This album was a mystery to me when I picked it up. There weren’t any identifying features to who created this album, no band name and no title (which might be different in the general release, I guess). The front … Continue reading

Posted in alt-folk, experimental, reviews - music, synth-pop | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Stronger in Numbers – Chris Tye (reviewed by Dave Franklin)

Playing a note on a guitar or singing a lyrical line is a fairly straightforward job. These days it seems as if you could blindly throw a stone and not fail to hit some over-entitled, gap-year troubadour treating us to … Continue reading

Posted in acoustica, alt-folk, folk, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

A Thousand Mandolins – David Marx (reviewed by Dave Franklin)

An album is more than just a collection of songs; it is a window into where an artist is, mentally, physically and often more telling, logistically, at the point of recording. 2014’s compact and bijou five track The Ghost of … Continue reading

Posted in alt-folk, alt-pop, baroque -pop, folk, pop, pop-rock, power-pop, rock, rock and roll, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

CradleRock – Craig Johnstone (reviewed by Dave Franklin)

When I first encountered Craig’s music it was via the refreshingly raw, honest and self-deprecating country-punk meets frantic folk collision of last years We Humans album. And if within that that wonderfully raw musical landscape of satire and sympathy, profanity … Continue reading

Posted in alt-country, alt-folk, blues, folk-punk, rock, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Weeding Out The Wicked – The Two Man Travelling Medicine Show (reviewed by Dave Franklin)

Last time I dipped my toe into the crazy waters of The Two Man Travelling Medicine Show it was to experience their clattering cider-punk-country-hoedown Tightropin’ a song which gave me the opportunity to roll out all those literary juxtapositions and … Continue reading

Posted in alt-country, alt-folk, bluegrass, country, folk, folk rock, folk-punk, punk, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment