Scene and Heard- CCCXXI: Blue Angel – RGF (reviewed by Dave Franklin)

RGFjpeg_phixrAs one of those jaded journo’s that you always hear about, I guess I’m always looking to fit music into easy pigeon-holes, to stick a label on it and keep things in nice tidy demarcated genres. That said, some of the most interesting music to write about is the sort of thing that isn’t easy to work out, music that defies simple categorisation, music which just won’t play by the damn rules.  Not only do RGF not sit easily with modern trend or classification, I feel that no matter what era they had appeared in they would always be considered out side the norm. The freaks!

It’s rock for sure, but more a visceral, wailing garage rock vibe than the usual conventions, seeped in belligerent, sneering punk vocals and psyched out, post-punk clattering chaos all put to rigid back beats and a driving, anchoring bass. Throw in some rock, alt-rock, mutant blues…call it what you will and you are starting to get where their outsider vibe is coming from. You can see what’s going on, yet the way that it wilfully doesn’t quite fit together is not only its charm and selling point but what makes it stand out from the pack, the greatest skill here being their ability to reign everything in just enough to stop it all careering off into the abyss.

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Scene and Heard – CCXCII :  Spanish Orange – RGF (reviewed by Dave Franklin)

RGF coverjpeg_phixrImagine if Mudhoney had paid their dues in the industrial wastelands of Birmingham, England in the late sixties. Or conversely Black Sabbath had invented grunge whilst touring around the American North-West. You can’t imagine either of those scenarios? Well, take a listen to Spanish Orange by RGF and you get a sonic glimpse of what either of those alternative scenarios might have resulted in. It’s a song that blends the slow, doom laden riffs of the originators of heavy metal with the uncompromising, raw edged onslaught that those stalwarts of grunge were known for.

And because of these conflicting and disparate sounds that seem to entwine at the heart of their music they are a difficult band to place both in time and also geographically speaking. The best you can say is that they probably exist somewhere in the western world sometime from the seventies onwards. That’s actually a great quality to have. Why would you want to be identifiable as this genre or that style when you can be a mercurial, hard-hitting and highly unique blend of references?

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